Lately I've been on a number of interviews and a common question seems to be, "What are your favorite modules?"  I seem to be misunderstanding the question.  

You see, I'll answer that question with a few minute soliloquy on a module like the convert bundles module and how it saved me a bunch of time  on a project where I had to merge a number of redundant content types.  Or how useful twig tweak was when I was trying to insert a block into the middle of a views listing.  Maybe discuss how I use Twig Debugger and Config Split to have twig debugging turned on in a dev region but turned off in live yet still have a common services.yml checked Into git.   You see to me "favorite" is an ephemeral thing, often tied into the problem I'm trying to solve at that moment.  And I felt an answer like this shows not just that I know a list of modules, but how I use them and helps the interviewer know my thought process.

When I answer this way, I get what feels like a combination of confusion and disappointment off the interviewer.  So I worked up the nerve on a recent interview to say, "I don't think I gave you what you want there, did I?".  She replied:

Most People Mention Views or Webform.

I immediately knew where the problem was.  I am interpreting "favorite" as "modules you have a passion for" not "modules you use on almost every build".  It's funny I have been asked "What modules do you use a lot?" and my answer to that is, "Views, Webforms, Paragraphs, Metatag, Media, starting to use Layout Builder, etc.".  But to me these are very different questions.  Much like if someone asks what my favorite beverage is, I don't mention water, although it should be the beverage I should drink most.

I also have to admit, when it comes to modules. I've become spoiled.  I start 90% of my builds with a custom install profile, based on Varbase.  I've configured a number of popular modules and don't think about them.

Either way, I live and learn.